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The following are the baseball events of the year 1960 throughout the world.  

This year in baseball

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1950s

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1940s

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1930s

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1920s

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1910s

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1900s

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1890s

1899 • 1898 • 1897 • 1896 • 1895
1894 • 1893 • 1892 • 1891 • 1890

1880s

1889 • 1888 • 1887 • 1886 • 1885
1884 • 1883 • 1882 • 1881 • 1880

1870s

1879 • 1878 • 1877 • 1876 • 1875
1874 • 1873 • 1872 • 1871 • 1870

1860s

1869 • 1868 • 1867 • 1866 • 1865
1864 • 1863 • 1862 • 1861 • 1860

See also
Sources


Champions

Major League Baseball

Other champions

Awards and honors

MLB Statistical Leaders

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Pete Runnels BOS .320 Dick Groat PIT .325
HR Mickey Mantle NYY 40 Ernie Banks CHC 41
RBI Roger Maris NYY 112 Hank Aaron MLB 126
Wins Chuck Estrada BAL &
Jim Perry MIN
18 Ernie Broglio STL &
Warren Spahn MLB
21
ERA Frank Baumann CHW 2.67 Mike McCormick SFG 2.70
Ks Jim Bunning DET 201 Don Drysdale LAD 246

Major League Baseball final standings

American League final standings

Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
1st New York Yankees 97   57 .630     --
2nd Baltimore Orioles 89   65 .578   8.0
3rd Chicago White Sox 87   67 .565   10.0
4th Cleveland Indians 76   78 .494   21.0
5th Washington Senators 73   81 .474   24.0
6th Detroit Tigers 71   83 .461   26.0
7th Boston Red Sox 65   89 .422   32.0
8th Kansas City Athletics 58   96 .377   39.0

National League final standings

Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
1st Pittsburgh Pirates 95   59 .617     --
2nd Milwaukee Braves 88   66 .571   7.0
3rd St. Louis Cardinals 86   68 .558   9.0
4th Los Angeles Dodgers 82   72 .532   13.0
5th San Francisco Giants 79   75 .513   16.0
6th Cincinnati Reds 67   87 .435   28.0
7th Chicago Cubs 60   94 .390   35.0
8th Philadelphia Phillies 59   95 .383   36.0

Events

January-February

  • January 5 - The Continental League, a proposed third major league, gets an assurance of Congressional support from New York Senator Kenneth Keating.
  • February 4 - For the second straight election, the BBWAA voters fail to elect a new member to the Baseball Hall of Fame member. Edd Roush gets 146 votes, but 202 are necessary for election. Sam Rice (143) and Eppa Rixey (142) are next in line.
  • February 15 - Cienfuegos completes a 6–0 sweep to give Cuba the Caribbean World Series championship for the fifth straight year. Pitcher Camilo Pascual wins two games, including the Series clincher against Puerto Rico.
  • February 18 - Walter O'Malley, owner of the Los Angeles Dodgers, completes the purchase of the Chavez Ravine area in Los Angeles by paying $494,000 for property valued at $92,000.
  • February 20 - Branch Rickey meets with officials of the proposed Western Carolinas League about pooling talent for Continental League clubs.
  • February 23 - Demolition of Ebbets Field begins. Lucy Monroe sings the National Anthem, and Roy Campanella is given an urn of dirt from behind home plate.

March-April

May

  • May 1 - Skinny Brown of the Baltimore Orioles pitches a 4–1 win over the Yankees. Brown allows just one hit, a first inning home run by Mickey Mantle. Rookie Ron Hansen matches Mantle to up his RBI total to an American League high 32.
  • May 4:
    • The Chicago Cubs make a trade with WGN plucking Lou Boudreau out of the broadcast booth to replace Charlie Grimm (6-11) as Cubs manager. "Jolly Cholly" replaces Boudreau behind the mike. The Cubs win, 5–1, over the Pirates as pitcher Dick Ellsworth gains his first ML victory.
    • Baltimore Orioles catcher Gus Triandos sets a pair of American League records with three passed balls in one inning (6th) and four in one game, but knuckleballer Hoyt Wilhelm, making a rare start, goes seven innings and gets credit for a 6–4 Baltimore win over the Chicago White Sox. Early Wynn records his 2,000th strikeout in a no-decision effort for Chicago. Triandos' PB mark for an inning will be tied by reserve backstop Myron Ginsberg in six days, and Tom Egan will collect five PBs in 1970 to erase Triandos' name of the list.
  • May 6 - The Dodgers send veteran outfielder Sandy Amorós to Detroit for first baseman Gail Harris.
  • May 7:
    • Pitcher Larry Sherry and catcher Norm Sherry of the Dodgers become the 10th sibling battery in ML history. Norman belts an 11th-inning home run to give his reliever brother Larry a 3–2 win against the Phillies.
    • Boston Red Sox pitcher Bill Monbouquette allows just one hit in beating the visiting Detroit Tigers, 5–0. Neil Chrisley's double is the only Tigers hit.
    • Takehiko Bessho becomes the winningest pitcher in Japanese baseball as his Tokyo Giants beat the Hanshin Tigers 6–3. Bessho has 302 wins in the league, one more than Victor Starfin.
  • May 10:
  • May 11:
    • Sam Jones pitches a two-hitter and draws a bases loaded walk for the only run, as the Giants edge the visitors Phillies, 1–0. Jim Owens is the loser.
    • The Phillies announce a trade of first baseman Ed Bouchee and pitcher Don Cardwell to the Chicago Cubs for second baseman Tony Taylor and catcher Cal Neeman.
  • May 12 - Duplicating Sam Jones' effort of yesterday, the Giants' Jack Sanford pitches a two-hit, 1–0 win over the Phillies. Sanford matches Jones by striking out 11 and walking three.
  • May 13:
  • May 19 - The New York Yankees send shortstop Andy Carey to the Kansas City Athletics for slugger Bob Cerv. Cerv had been with the Yankees for five years before going to KC where he hit 38 home runs in 1958 and was chosen as the American League left fielder in the All-Star game over Ted Williams. Cerv will be claimed in the 1960 expansion draft and the Yankees will again reacquire him.
  • May 25 - George Crowe of the St. Louis Cardinals set a major league record with his 11th pinch-hit home run, off Don McMahon, as the Cardinals win, 5–3, over the Braves. Crowe began the season tied with Smoky Burgess and Gus Zernial in most career pinch home runs.
  • May 27:
    • Since there is no rule limiting the size or shape of the catcher's mitt, Baltimore manager Paul Richards combats the team passed-ball problem while catching Hoyt Wilhelm (38 in 1959; 11 so far this year) by devising an oversized mitt to gather in Wilhelm's fluttering knuckleball. It is half again as large as the standard glove and 40 ounces heavier. Wilhelm goes the distance in beating New York, 3–2, at Yankee Stadium. Catcher Clint Courtney has no passed balls behind the plate.
    • Camilo Pascual strikes out 13 but the Washington Senators loses to the Boston Red Sox, 4–3, his third loss to Boston this year.
  • May 28 - Manager Casey Stengel is hospitalized with a virus and high fever and will miss 13 games. The Yankees goes 7-6 under interim manager Ralph Houk.

June

  • June 12 - In a record-tying three hour and 52 minute, 9-inning game, Willie McCovey's pinch-hit grand slam, the first slam of his career, and Orlando Cepeda's three-run double pace the Giants to a 16–7 rout of the Braves.
  • June 15 - Mexico City and Poza Rica combine to hit 12 home runs in one game, a Mexican League record.
  • June 19 - In a brilliant pair of pitching performances, Orioles pitchers Hoyt Wilhelm and Milt Pappas threw shutouts to beat the host Detroit Tigers. Wilhelm allowed two hits in winning the opener, 2–0, over Jim Bunning, and Pappas allows three hits in winning the nitecap, 1–0, over Don Mossi. Jim Gentile and Ron Hansen collected home runs as catcher Clint Courtney, using the big glove designed by manager Paul Richards, is twice charged with batter interference, the first loading the bases in the 4th inning.
  • June 24 - Willie Mays belted two home runs and made 10 putouts to lead the Giants in a 5–3 win at Cincinnati. Mays added three RBI, three runs scored, a single and stole home.
  • June 26 - Hoping to speed up the election process, the Hall of Fame changes its voting procedures. The new rules allow the Special Veterans Committee to vote annually, rather than every other year, and to induct up to two players a year. The BBWAA is authorized to hold a runoff election of the top 30 vote getters if no one is elected in the first ballot.
  • June 30 - Dick Stuart blasts three consecutive home runs, as the Pirates split with the Giants. Stuart drives in seven runs and joins Ralph Kiner as the second Pirates player to hit three home runs in a game at Forbes Field.

July

  • July 4 - Mickey Mantle's three-run first-inning home run off Hal Woodeshick is the 300th of his career. Mantle becomes the 18th major leaguer to join the 300-HR club, but the Yankees drop a 9–8 decision to the Senators.
  • July 8 = The Cuban revolution led by Fidel Castro brought an end to Havana's International League team. The Sugar Kings relocate in Jersey City, marking that city's return to the International League after a 10-year absence. Poor attendance at Roosevelt Stadium prompts the parent Cincinnati Reds to cease the minor league operation there following the 1960 season.
  • July 9 - Jim Coates suffered his first loss after nine straight wins, and 14 straight over two seasons, as the Boston Red Sox beat the Yankees, 6–5. The Sox are lead by Vic Wertz, who hit a home run, double and single to drive in four runs. Coates' major-league career-record is 17–2.
  • July 11 - At KC Municipal Stadium, one-hit three-innings shutout pitching by Bob Friend and home runs by Ernie Banks and Del Crandall paced the National League to a 5–4 win over the American League in the first of two All-Star Games. Friend, of the Pittsburgh Pirates, has notched two of the NL's last three All-Star wins.
  • July 13 - At Yankee Stadium, Vern Law became the second Pirates pitcher to win a 1960 All-Star Game, working two scoreless innings. Stan Musial came off the National League bench and hit his record sixth and last All-Star Game home run. Willie Mays, Ken Boyer and Eddie Mathews also homered in the 6–0 NL win, the third shutout in All-Star Game history. Law (1st, 2nd) combined the eight-hit shutout along with Johnny Podres (3rd), Stan Williams (5th, 6th), Larry Jackson (7th), Bill Henry (8th) and Lindy McDaniel (9th). Whitey Ford was the loser.
  • July 18 - The National League votes to expand to 10 clubs if the Continental League does not join organized baseball. The new NL clubs would invade CL territories.
  • July 19:
  • Senators ace Pedro Ramos pitches a one-hitter 5–0 shutout over Detroit. Rocky Colavito's leadoff single in the eighth inning, a grounder that eludes shortstop José Valdivielso, is the lone safety.
  • July 20 - At Cleveland Municipal Stadium, Mickey Mantle golfs a Gary Bell pitch over the auxiliary scoreboard into the distant upper deck in right field, matching Luke Easter as the only major league players to reach that spot. Cleveland holds on for an 8–6 win over the Yankees.
  • July 21 - Robin Roberts pitches his third career one-hitter, and the 3rd one-hitter of the season in new Candlestick Park. Felipe Alou spoils Roberts' no-hit bid in the fifth inning of a 3–0 Phillies victory. Third baseman Joe Morgan fields the hit, but falls down and cannot make a throw.
  • July 22 - At Fenway Park, the Boston Red Sox down the Cleveland Indians, 6–4. Vic Wertz has a three-run home run and four RBI. Ted Williams also homers, and in the 7th inning, steals second base. Williams sets a major league record as the only player to steal bases in four consecutive decades. He'll be match by Rickey Henderson in 2000. Indians Jimmy Piersall homers twice, both off winner Ike Delock.
  • July 23- Kansas City outfielder Whitey Herzog hits into the only All-Cuban Triple Play in ML history. The action goes from Washington Senators starting pitcher Pedro Ramos, to first baseman Julio Bécquer, to shortstop José Valdivielso. The victory, however, goes to reliever Chuck Stobbs (7-2) as the Senators take an 8–3 decision. Harmon Killebrew has a two-run home run.
  • July 27 - William Shea, chairman of Mayor Robert Wagner's New York baseball committee, announces the formation of the Continental League. The five founding cities are New York City, Houston, Toronto, Denver and Minneapolis/St. Paul.
  • July 30 - Just as he predicts, Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Art Mahaffey picks off the first batter to get a hit against him. Then with the next batter to get a hit, he does it again. Curt Flood and Bill White of the St. Louis Cardinals are the base runner victims, but St. Louis still wins, 6–3. In his next game, the first batter to get a hit off Mahaffey will be Jim Marshall, and Mahaffey will pick him off as well.

August

  • August 2 - In an agreement with the major leagues, the Continental League abandons plans to join the American League and National League. Walter O'Malley, chairman of the NL Expansion Committee, says, "We immediately will recommend expansion and that we would like to do it in 1961." Milwaukee Braves owner Lou Perini proposes a compromise that four of the CL territories be admitted to the current majors in orderly expansion. Branch Rickey's group quickly accepts. The Continental League ends without playing a game.
  • August 3 - In an unusual move, Cleveland Indians GM Frank Lane trades managers with Detroit Tigers GM Bill DeWitt. The Indians' Joe Gordon (49-46) is dealt to the Tigers for Jimmy Dykes (44-52). For one game, until the pair can change places, Jo-Jo White pilots the Indians and Billy Hitchcock guides the Tigers.
  • August 7 - The Chicago White Sox win a pair from the Washington Senators, with reliever Gerry Staley picking up two victories. Staley will be 13–8, all in relief, with both wins and losses topping the American League relievers.
  • August 8 - Before a day crowd of 48,323, the largest day crowd ever at Comiskey Park, cheer White Sox pitcher Billy Pierce four-hit victory over the Yankees, 9–1. Pierce faces just 31 batters.
  • August 9 - With fine relief pitching of Lindy McDaniel in the opener and a five-hitter by Curt Simmons in the nitecap, the St. Louis Cardinals sweep the Philadelphia Phillies, 5–4 and 6–0. Phillies Tony Taylor ties a major league record for a second baseman by going the entire doubleheader (18 innings) without a putout – the first to achieve the feat since Connie Ryan, of the Phillies, on June 14, 1953.
  • August 10 - Ted Williams blast a pair of home runs and a double to pace the Red Sox to a 6–1 win over the Cleveland Indians. Williams has 21 homers for the season. The first of the two today, #512, moves him past Mel Ott into fourth place on the all-time list. After the game, Williams announces that he will retire at the end of the season.
  • August 18 - Almost a perfect game. Facing just the minimum 27 batters, Lew Burdette of the Milwaukee Braves pitches a 1–0 no-hitter against the Phillies. Tony González, the only Phillies base runner, reached first base in the fifth inning after being hit by a pitch and was wiped out in a double play. The Milwaukee pitcher also scores the only run of the game.
  • August 20 - Ted Williams draws the 2,000th walk of his career in the Red Sox' split of a twi-night doubleheader with the Orioles. Williams joins Babe Ruth as the only major leaguers to collect 2,000 walks. Rickey Henderson in 2000, and Barry Bonds in 2003, will join the select 2,000 walks group.
  • August 23 - Following up his no-hitter, Lew Burdette fires his third shutout in a row, pitching the Milwaukee Braves to a 7–0 win over the Los Angeles Dodgers.
  • August 27 - After pitching 32 2/3 shutout innings, Braves pitcher Lew Burdette gives up a Felipe Alou home run as San Francisco defeats the Braves 3–1.
  • August 30 - Boston Red Sox second baseman Pete Runnels goes 6-for-7, as Boston edge the Tigers in the 15-inning opener of a twin bill. Runnels’ 15th-inning double brings Frank Malzone home with the winning run to win, 5–4. Runnels has three more hits in the nightcap victory, 3–2 in 10 innings. His six hits are the most in an American League game since July 8, 1955. With 9-for-11 in the doubleheader, Runnels ties the major league record.

September

October

November-December

Births

January-March

April-June

July-September

October-December

Deaths

  • February 16 - Stuffy McInnis, 69, excellent fielding first baseman who batted .307 career, most prominently with the Philadelphia Athletics' "$100,000 infield"
  • March 2 - Howie Camnitz, 78, pitcher who had three 20-win campaigns for the Pirates
  • May 6 - Vern Bickford, 39, pitcher who won 66 games for the Braves, including a no-hitter
  • June 25 - Tommy Corcoran, 91, longtime shortstop, and captain of the Cincinnati Reds for 10 years
  • July 17 - Pat Duncan, 66, Cincinnati Reds outfielder who was the first player to homer over Crosley Field's left-field fence
  • August 14 - Fred Clarke, 87, Hall of Fame left fielder and manager of the Pittsburgh Pirates who batted .312 in his career, and became one of the first dozen players to make 2500 hits and the first manager to win 1500 games
  • October 16 - Arch McDonald, 59, broadcaster for the Washington Senators from 1934 to 1956
  • November 2 - Everett Scott, 67, shortstop who played in 1,307 consecutive games from 1916 to 1925, a record later broken by Lou Gehrig
  • November 3 - Bobby Wallace, 86, Hall of Fame shortstop for the St. Louis Browns who set several fielding records, later a scout for the Cincinnati Reds for 33 years
  • December 10 - Ernie Quigley, 80, National League umpire from 1913 to 1937 who worked in six World Series, was later a league supervisor
  • December 18 - Art Nehf, 68, pitcher who won 184 games for four National League teams
  • December 22 - Jack Onslow, 72, manager of the White Sox in 1949-50, formerly a catcher, coach and scout
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