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Brooklyn Dodgers

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The City of [[Brooklyn]] had a history of outstanding [[baseball]] clubs dating back to the mid-[[1850s]], notably the [[Brooklyn Atlantics]], the [[Brooklyn Eckfords]] and the [[Brooklyn Excellsiors|Brooklyn Excelsiors]], who combined to dominate play through the late [[1860s]] as part of the [[National Association of Base Ball Players]]. The first baseball game requiring paid admission was an all star contest between New York and Brooklyn in [[1858]]. Brooklyn also featured the first two enclosed baseball grounds, the [[Union Grounds]] and the [[Capitoline Grounds]], which accelerated the evolution of the game from [[amateur]]ism to [[professional]]ism. Despite the success of Brooklyn clubs in amateur play, however, no strong Brooklyn-based club emerged after the first professional league, the [[National Association of Professional Baseball Players]], was formed in [[1871]].
 
The City of [[Brooklyn]] had a history of outstanding [[baseball]] clubs dating back to the mid-[[1850s]], notably the [[Brooklyn Atlantics]], the [[Brooklyn Eckfords]] and the [[Brooklyn Excellsiors|Brooklyn Excelsiors]], who combined to dominate play through the late [[1860s]] as part of the [[National Association of Base Ball Players]]. The first baseball game requiring paid admission was an all star contest between New York and Brooklyn in [[1858]]. Brooklyn also featured the first two enclosed baseball grounds, the [[Union Grounds]] and the [[Capitoline Grounds]], which accelerated the evolution of the game from [[amateur]]ism to [[professional]]ism. Despite the success of Brooklyn clubs in amateur play, however, no strong Brooklyn-based club emerged after the first professional league, the [[National Association of Professional Baseball Players]], was formed in [[1871]].
   
The Brooklyn baseball club that would become the Dodgers was first formed in 1883, and joined the [[American Association (19th century)|American Association]] the following year. The “Bridegrooms” won the AA pennant in [[1889]]. Upon switching to the [[National League]] in [[1890]], the franchise became the only one in MLB history to win pennants in different leagues in consecutive years. Eight years passed before any more success followed. Several [[Baseball Hall of Fame|Hall of Fame]] players were sold to Brooklyn by the soon-to-be-defunct [[Baltimore Orioles (NL)|Baltimore Orioles]], along with their manager, [[Ned Hanlon]]. [[Brooklyn]] was a sepearate City until it merged with New York City to become one of the 5 boroughs in [[1898]]. The team name continued to include [[Brooklyn]] in the title. This catapulted Brooklyn to instant contention, and “Hanlon's Superbas” lived up to their name, winning pennants in [[1899]] and [[1900]].
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The Brooklyn baseball club that would become the Dodgers was first formed in 1883, and joined the [[American Association (19th century)|American Association]] the following year. The “Bridegrooms” won the AA pennant in [[1889]]. Upon switching to the [[National League]] in [[1890]], the franchise became the only one in MLB history to win pennants in different leagues in consecutive years. Eight years passed before any more success followed. Several [[Baseball Hall of Fame|Hall of Fame]] players were sold to Brooklyn by the soon-to-be-defunct [[Baltimore Orioles (NL)|Baltimore Orioles]], along with their manager, [[Ned Hanlon]]. This catapulted Brooklyn to instant contention, and “Hanlon's Superbas” lived up to their name, winning pennants in [[1899]] and [[1900]].
   
 
Teams of this era played in two principal ballparks, [[Washington Park]] and [[Eastern Park]]. They first earned the nickname “Trolley Dodgers,” later shortened to Dodgers, while at [[Eastern Park]] during the [[1890s]] because of the difficulty fans had in reaching the ballpark due to the number of trolley lines in the area. The club also engaged in a series of mergers during this period, acquiring the [[New York Metropolitans]] in [[1888]] for territorial protection and star contracts, merging with the [[Brooklyn Wonders]] in [[1891]] as part of the [[Players League]] settlement, and merging with the [[Baltimore Orioles (NL)]] in [[1900]] as part of the [[National League]]'s consolidation of clubs.
 
Teams of this era played in two principal ballparks, [[Washington Park]] and [[Eastern Park]]. They first earned the nickname “Trolley Dodgers,” later shortened to Dodgers, while at [[Eastern Park]] during the [[1890s]] because of the difficulty fans had in reaching the ballpark due to the number of trolley lines in the area. The club also engaged in a series of mergers during this period, acquiring the [[New York Metropolitans]] in [[1888]] for territorial protection and star contracts, merging with the [[Brooklyn Wonders]] in [[1891]] as part of the [[Players League]] settlement, and merging with the [[Baltimore Orioles (NL)]] in [[1900]] as part of the [[National League]]'s consolidation of clubs.
   
In 1902, [[Ned Hanlon]] expressed his desire to buy a controlling interest in the team and move it (back, effectively) to [[Baltimore]]. His plan was blocked by a lifelong club employee, [[Charles Ebbets]], who put himself heavily in debt to buy the team and keep it in the borough. Ebbets’ ambition did not stop at owning the team. He desired to replace the dilapidated [[Washington Park]] with a new ballpark, and again invested heavily to finance the construction of [[Ebbets Field]], which would become the Dodgers' home in [[1913 in sports|1913]]. {Ebbets Field]] was the team's home park from [[1913]]-[[1957]].
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In 1902, Hanlon expressed his desire to buy a controlling interest in the team and move it (back, effectively) to [[Baltimore]]. His plan was blocked by a lifelong club employee, [[Charles Ebbets]], who put himself heavily in debt to buy the team and keep it in the borough. Ebbets’ ambition did not stop at owning the team. He desired to replace the dilapidated [[Washington Park]] with a new ballpark, and again invested heavily to finance the construction of [[Ebbets Field]], which would become the Dodgers' home in [[1913 in sports|1913]].
   
 
===“Uncle Robbie” and the “Daffiness Boys”===
 
===“Uncle Robbie” and the “Daffiness Boys”===
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