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| former_names = Candlestick Park (1960–1995, 2008–present)<br />[[3Com]] Park at Candlestick Point (1995–2002)<br />San Francisco Stadium at Candlestick Point (2002–2004)<br />Monster Park (2004–2008)
 
| former_names = Candlestick Park (1960–1995, 2008–present)<br />[[3Com]] Park at Candlestick Point (1995–2002)<br />San Francisco Stadium at Candlestick Point (2002–2004)<br />Monster Park (2004–2008)
 
| tenants = [[San Francisco Giants]] ([[Major League Baseball|MLB]]) (1960–1999)<br />San Francisco 49ers (NFL) (1971–Current)<br /> Oakland Raiders (AFL) (1961)
 
| tenants = [[San Francisco Giants]] ([[Major League Baseball|MLB]]) (1960–1999)<br />San Francisco 49ers (NFL) (1971–Current)<br /> Oakland Raiders (AFL) (1961)
| seating_capacity = 69,732<ref>http://prod.static.49ers.clubs.nfl.com/assets/docs/media-guide/2009/red-zone.pdf</ref> (Football)
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| seating_capacity = 69,732<ref>http://prod.static.49ers.clubs.nfl.com/assets/docs/media-guide/2009/red-zone.pdf</ref> ([[American Football|Football]])
 
|}}
 
|}}
   
'''Candlestick Park''' (also commonly referred to as '''Candlestick''' or '''The Stick''') is an outdoor sports and entertainment stadium located in San Francisco, California, in the Bayview Heights area. The stadium was originally built as the home of [[Major League Baseball]]'s [[San Francisco Giants]], who played there from 1960 until moving into Pacific Bell Park (since renamed [[AT&T Park]]) in 2000. Currently it is the home field of the San Francisco 49ers NFL team, who moved in for the 1971 season. Candlestick Park is set to be replaced by a new 49ers Stadium in 2014.
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'''Candlestick Park''' (also commonly referred to as '''Candlestick''' or '''The Stick''') is an outdoor sports and entertainment stadium located in San Francisco, California, in the Bayview Heights area. The stadium was originally built as the home of [[Major League Baseball]]'s [[San Francisco Giants]], who played there from 1960 until moving into Pacific Bell Park (since renamed [[AT&T Park]]) in 2000. Currently it is the home field of the San Francisco 49ers NFL team, who moved in for the 1971 season. Candlestick Park is set to be replaced by a new 49ers Stadium in 2015.
   
 
The stadium is situated at Candlestick Point on the western shore of the San Francisco Bay. Due to its location next to the bay, strong winds often swirl down into the stadium, creating unusual playing conditions. At the time of its construction in the late 1950s, the stadium site was one of the few pieces of land available in the city that was suitable for a sports stadium and had space for the 10,000 parking spaces promised to the Giants.
 
The stadium is situated at Candlestick Point on the western shore of the San Francisco Bay. Due to its location next to the bay, strong winds often swirl down into the stadium, creating unusual playing conditions. At the time of its construction in the late 1950s, the stadium site was one of the few pieces of land available in the city that was suitable for a sports stadium and had space for the 10,000 parking spaces promised to the Giants.
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==Park history==
 
==Park history==
 
[[Image:Original Candlestick.jpg|thumb|left|Baseball configuration, 1960]]
 
[[Image:Original Candlestick.jpg|thumb|left|Baseball configuration, 1960]]
When the New York Giants arrived in San Francisco in 1958, they played their home games at the old [[Seals Stadium]] at 16th and Bryant Streets. The City of San Francisco agreed to build a stadium if they moved from New York. Most of the land at Candlestick Point was purchased from Charles Harney, a local contractor. Harney purchased the land in 1952 for a quarry and industrial development. He made a profit of over $2 million when he sold the land for the stadium. Harney received a no-bid contract to build the stadium. The entire deal was the subject of a Grand Jury investigation in 1958. Ground was broken in 1958 for the new home of [[Major League Baseball]]'s [[San Francisco Giants]], who had moved west from New York following the end of the 1957 season. The Giants selected the name of '''Candlestick Park''' after a name-the-park contest on March 3, 1959. Prior to that, its construction site had been shown on maps as the generic '''''Bay View Stadium'''''.<ref>{{cite news |title=Pot Luck|author=|newspaper=St. Petersburg Times|date=1959-03-04 |url=http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=KdMNAAAAIBAJ&sjid=9nYDAAAAIBAJ&pg=5404,2134654&dq=phillies&hl=en|page=3-C }}</ref> It was the first modern baseball stadium, as it was the first to be built entirely of reinforced concrete.<ref name="Storied">{{cite book|last=Smith|first=Curt|authorlink=Curt Smith (author)|title=Storied Stadiums|year=2001|publisher=Carroll & Graf|location=New York City|isbn=0786711876}}</ref> Then Vice-President Richard Nixon threw out the first [[baseball]] on the opening day of Candlestick Park on April 12, 1960, and the Oakland Raiders played the last three games of their 1960 season, and their entire 1961 American Football League season, at Candlestick.
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When the New York Giants arrived in San Francisco in 1958, they played their home games at the old [[Seals Stadium]] at 16th and Bryant Streets. The City of San Francisco agreed to build a stadium if they moved from New York. Most of the land at Candlestick Point was purchased from Charles Harney, a local contractor. Harney purchased the land in 1952 for a quarry and industrial development. He made a profit of over $2 million when he sold the land for the stadium. Harney received a no-bid contract to build the stadium. The entire deal was the subject of a Grand Jury investigation in 1958. Ground was broken in 1958 for the new home of [[Major League Baseball]]'s [[San Francisco Giants]], who had moved west from New York following the end of the 1957 season. The Giants selected the name of '''Candlestick Park''' after a name-the-park contest on March 3, 1959. Prior to that, its construction site had been shown on maps as the generic '''''Bay View Stadium'''''.<ref>{{cite news |title=Pot Luck|author=|newspaper=St. Petersburg Times|date=1959-03-04 |url=http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=KdMNAAAAIBAJ&sjid=9nYDAAAAIBAJ&pg=5404,2134654&dq=phillies&hl=en|page=3-C }}</ref> It was the first modern baseball stadium, as it was the first to be built entirely of reinforced concrete.<ref name="Storied">{{cite book|last=Smith|first=Curt|authorlink=Curt Smith (author)|title=Storied Stadiums|year=2001|publisher=Carroll & Graf|location=New York City|isbn=0786711876}}</ref> Then Vice-President Richard Nixon threw out the first [[baseball]] on the opening day of Candlestick Park on April 12, 1960, and the Oakland Raiders played the last three games of their 1960 season, and their entire 1961 American Football League season, at Candlestick.
   
 
The Beatles played their last live commercial concert at Candlestick Park on August 29, 1966.
 
The Beatles played their last live commercial concert at Candlestick Park on August 29, 1966.
   
The stadium was enclosed during the winter of 1971&ndash;72 for the 49ers, with stands built around the outfield. The result was that the wind speed dropped marginally, but often swirled around throughout the stadium, and the view of the Bay was lost.
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The stadium was enclosed during the winter of 1971&ndash;72 for the 49ers, with stands built around the outfield. The result was that the wind speed dropped marginally, but often swirled around throughout the stadium, and the view of [[San Francisco Bay|the Bay]] was lost.
   
The stadium hosted two MLB All-Star Games (1961 and [[1984 Major League Baseball All-Star Game|1984]]), one [[National League Division Series]] ([[1997 NLDS|1997]]), three [[National League Championship Series]] ([[1971 NLCS|1971]], [[1987 NLCS|1987]] and [[1989 NLCS|1989]]), two World Series ([[1962 World Series|1962]] and [[1989 World Series|1989]]), and six NFC Championship games, the most notable being in January 1982 when Dwight Clark caught a game-winning touchdown pass from Joe Montana to lead the 49ers to their first Super Bowl. Candlestick Park was also home to dozens of commercial shoots as well as the location for the climatic scene in both the 1962 thriller ''Experiment in Terror'' and the 1973 Richard Rush comedy ''Freebie and the Bean''. In February, 2011 scenes for "Contagion" staring Matt Damon, Kate Winslet and Jude Law were filmed at the stadium.
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The stadium hosted two MLB All-Star Games (1961 and [[1984 Major League Baseball All-Star Game|1984]]), one [[National League Division Series]] ([[1997 NLDS|1997]]), three [[National League Championship Series]] ([[1971 NLCS|1971]], [[1987 NLCS|1987]] and [[1989 NLCS|1989]]), two World Series ([[1962 World Series|1962]] and [[1989 World Series|1989]]), and six NFC Championship games, the most notable being in January 1982 when Dwight Clark caught a game-winning touchdown pass from Joe Montana to lead the 49ers to their first Super Bowl (see "The Catch"). Candlestick Park was also home to dozens of commercial shoots as well as the location for the climatic scene in both the 1962 thriller ''Experiment in Terror'' and the 1973 Richard Rush comedy ''Freebie and the Bean''. In February, 2011 scenes for "Contagion" staring Matt Damon, Kate Winslet and Jude Law were filmed at the stadium.
   
On October 17, 1989, the Loma Prieta earthquake (measuring 7.1 on the Richter Scale) struck San Francisco, minutes before Game 3 of the [[1989 World Series|World Series]] was to begin at Candlestick. Remarkably, no one within the stadium was injured, although minor structural damage was incurred to the stadium. Al Michaels and [[Tim McCarver]], who called the game for [[Major League Baseball on ABC|ABC]], later credited the stadium's design for saving thousands of lives.<ref name="Storied"/> The World Series between the Giants and [[1989 Oakland Athletics|Oakland Athletics]] was subsequently delayed for 10 days, in part to give engineers time to check the stadium's (and that of nearby [[Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum]]) overall structural soundness. During this time, the 49ers moved their game against the New England Patriots on October 22 to Stanford Stadium.
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On October 17, 1989, the Loma Prieta earthquake (measuring 7.1 on the Richter Scale) struck San Francisco, minutes before Game 3 of the [[1989 World Series|World Series]] was to begin at Candlestick. Remarkably, no one within the stadium was injured, although minor structural damage was incurred to the stadium. Al Michaels and [[Tim McCarver]], who called the game for [[Major League Baseball on ABC|ABC]], later credited the stadium's design for saving thousands of lives.<ref name="Storied"/> The World Series between the Giants and [[1989 Oakland Athletics season|Oakland Athletics]] was subsequently delayed for 10 days, in part to give engineers time to check the stadium's (and that of nearby [[Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum]]) overall structural soundness. During this time, the 49ers moved their game against the New England Patriots on October 22 to Stanford Stadium.
   
 
In 2000, the Giants moved to the new Pacific Bell Park (now called [[AT&T Park]]) in the South Beach neighborhood, leaving the 49ers as the sole professional sports team to use Candlestick. The final baseball game was played on Sept. 30, 1999, against the [[1999 Los Angeles Dodgers season|Los Angeles Dodgers]], who won 9&ndash;4.
 
In 2000, the Giants moved to the new Pacific Bell Park (now called [[AT&T Park]]) in the South Beach neighborhood, leaving the 49ers as the sole professional sports team to use Candlestick. The final baseball game was played on Sept. 30, 1999, against the [[1999 Los Angeles Dodgers season|Los Angeles Dodgers]], who won 9&ndash;4.
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During the first [[Major League Baseball All-Star Game|All Star Game]] of 1961 (one of two played in the park—the other was in 1984), Giants pitcher [[Stu Miller]] was blown off balance by a gust of wind and was charged with a [[balk]]. Two years later, wind picked up the entire batting cage and dropped it 60 feet (18 m) away on the pitcher’s mound while the [[New York Mets]] were taking batting practice.
 
During the first [[Major League Baseball All-Star Game|All Star Game]] of 1961 (one of two played in the park—the other was in 1984), Giants pitcher [[Stu Miller]] was blown off balance by a gust of wind and was charged with a [[balk]]. Two years later, wind picked up the entire batting cage and dropped it 60 feet (18 m) away on the pitcher’s mound while the [[New York Mets]] were taking batting practice.
   
The stadium also had the reputation as the coldest park in the major leagues. It was initially built with a radiant heating system of hot water pipes under the Lower Box seats in a space between the concrete and the ground. As the pipes were not embedded in the concrete it did not produce enough heat to offset the cold air. Both the city and the Giants balked at the cost of upgrading the system so it would work properly (e.g., to removing the seats and concrete, embedding larger pipes, and replacing the concrete and seats). As a result, the Giants played more day games than any Major League Baseball team except the [[Chicago Cubs]], whose ballpark, [[Wrigley Field]], did not have lights installed until 1988. Many locals, including Giants' broadcaster [[Lon Simmons]], were surprised at the decision to build the park right on the bay, in one of the coldest areas of the city.<ref name="Storied"/>
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The stadium also had the reputation as the coldest park in the major leagues. It was initially built with a [[radiant heating]] system of hot water pipes under the Lower Box seats in a space between the concrete and the ground. As the pipes were not embedded in the concrete it did not produce enough heat to offset the cold air. Both the city and the Giants balked at the cost of upgrading the system so it would work properly (e.g., to removing the seats and concrete, embedding larger pipes, and replacing the concrete and seats). As a result, the Giants played more day games than any Major League Baseball team except the [[Chicago Cubs]], whose ballpark, [[Wrigley Field]], did not have lights installed until 1988. Many locals, including Giants' broadcaster [[Lon Simmons]], were surprised at the decision to build the park right on the bay, in one of the coldest areas of the city.<ref name="Storied"/>
   
 
The Giants eventually played on the reputation to bolster fan support with promotions such as awarding the '''Croix de Candlestick pin''' to fans who stayed for the duration of extra-inning night games. Among many less-than-flattering fan nicknames for the park were "North Pole," "Candlestink," "Candleshit," "Cave of the Winds," and "Windlestick." Older fans called it "The Dump" in honor of the former use of the land. Ironically, the Giants played their last game at Candlestick under blue skies with no fog and a game time temperature of a very non-Candlestick-like 82 degrees.
 
The Giants eventually played on the reputation to bolster fan support with promotions such as awarding the '''Croix de Candlestick pin''' to fans who stayed for the duration of extra-inning night games. Among many less-than-flattering fan nicknames for the park were "North Pole," "Candlestink," "Candleshit," "Cave of the Winds," and "Windlestick." Older fans called it "The Dump" in honor of the former use of the land. Ironically, the Giants played their last game at Candlestick under blue skies with no fog and a game time temperature of a very non-Candlestick-like 82 degrees.
   
Giants owner [[Horace Stoneham]] visited the site as early as 1957. He was involved in the design of the stadium from the outset and was aware of the weather conditions. The architect designed the roof baffle to extend into left field to diminish the prevailing wind but the size of the structure was reduced for cost savings. In 1962, he commissioned a study of the wind conditions. The study revealed that conditions would have been significantly improved had the park been built one hundred yards farther to the north.<ref>http://www.nd.edu/~nathaz/doc/tribute-JEC-wind-engineer.pdf</ref> Locating the stadium in that location would have meant building it on landfill which is unstable during earthquakes. The stadium's location on the bedrock of Bayview Hill provided more stability.
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Giants owner [[Horace Stoneham]] visited the site as early as 1957. He was involved in the design of the stadium from the outset and was aware of the weather conditions. The architect designed the roof baffle to extend into left field to diminish the prevailing wind but the size of the structure was reduced for cost savings. In 1962, he commissioned a study of the wind conditions. The study revealed that conditions would have been significantly improved had the park been built one hundred yards farther to the north.<ref>http://www.nd.edu/~nathaz/doc/tribute-JEC-wind-engineer.pdf</ref> Locating the stadium in that location would have meant building it on fill which is unstable during earthquakes. The stadium's location on the bedrock of Bayview Hill provided more stability.
   
 
The winds are intense in the immediate area of the park. Studies showed they were no more frequent than other parts of San Francisco but are subject to higher gusts. This is because of a hill immediately adjacent to the park. This hill, in turn, is the first topographical obstacle met by the prevailing winds arriving from the Pacific Ocean seven miles to the west. Arriving at Candlestick from the Pacific, these winds travel through what is known as the Alemany Gap before reaching the hill. The combination of ocean winds free-flowing to Candlestick, then swirling over the adjacent hill created the cold and windy conditions that were the bane of the Giants' 40-year stay on Candlestick Point. These same winds, of course, attract wind-surfers in droves to the wind-whipped San Francisco Bay coves south of Candlestick. It is indeed the wind and not the ambient air temperature that provides Candlestick's famed chill. The Giants' subsequent home, [[AT&T Park]], is just one degree warmer, but is far less windy, creating a "warmer" (relatively speaking) effect. While the wind is a summer condition (hot inland, cool oceanside), winter weather is right in line with the rest of sea level Northern California (mild with occasional rain).
 
The winds are intense in the immediate area of the park. Studies showed they were no more frequent than other parts of San Francisco but are subject to higher gusts. This is because of a hill immediately adjacent to the park. This hill, in turn, is the first topographical obstacle met by the prevailing winds arriving from the Pacific Ocean seven miles to the west. Arriving at Candlestick from the Pacific, these winds travel through what is known as the Alemany Gap before reaching the hill. The combination of ocean winds free-flowing to Candlestick, then swirling over the adjacent hill created the cold and windy conditions that were the bane of the Giants' 40-year stay on Candlestick Point. These same winds, of course, attract wind-surfers in droves to the wind-whipped San Francisco Bay coves south of Candlestick. It is indeed the wind and not the ambient air temperature that provides Candlestick's famed chill. The Giants' subsequent home, [[AT&T Park]], is just one degree warmer, but is far less windy, creating a "warmer" (relatively speaking) effect. While the wind is a summer condition (hot inland, cool oceanside), winter weather is right in line with the rest of sea level Northern California (mild with occasional rain).
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On August 10, 2007, San Francisco mayor Gavin Newsom announced that the playing field would be renamed '''Bill Walsh Field''' in honor of the former Stanford and 49ers coach, who had died on July 30 that year, pending the approval of the city government. However the stadium will retain its current name as is contractually obligated.<ref>[http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/08/10/BAGBFRGLUT8.DTL&feed=rss.sports 8,000 turn out at Monster Park to say goodbye to Bill Walsh]</ref> Commentators still use this name occasionally, most recently when Jerry Rice's jersey was retired.
 
On August 10, 2007, San Francisco mayor Gavin Newsom announced that the playing field would be renamed '''Bill Walsh Field''' in honor of the former Stanford and 49ers coach, who had died on July 30 that year, pending the approval of the city government. However the stadium will retain its current name as is contractually obligated.<ref>[http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/08/10/BAGBFRGLUT8.DTL&feed=rss.sports 8,000 turn out at Monster Park to say goodbye to Bill Walsh]</ref> Commentators still use this name occasionally, most recently when Jerry Rice's jersey was retired.
   
On September 18, 2009, Sports Illustrated's Peter King used the mock-combination name "Candle3Monsterstick" in reference to the many name changes the stadium has gone through.<ref>{{cite news| url=http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/writers/peter_king/09/18/week2/index.html | work=CNN | title=Fascinating matchup in San Diego, more to watch this weekend | date=September 18, 2009 | accessdate=April 28, 2010}}</ref>
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On September 18, 2009, [[Sports Illustrated]]'s [[Peter King (sportswriter)|Peter King]] used the mock-combination name "Candle3Monsterstick" in reference to the many name changes the stadium has gone through.<ref>{{cite news| url=http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/writers/peter_king/09/18/week2/index.html | work=CNN | title=Fascinating matchup in San Diego, more to watch this weekend | date=September 18, 2009 | accessdate=April 28, 2010}}</ref>
   
 
==Future==
 
==Future==
 
{{Main|Proposed new 49ers stadium}}
 
{{Main|Proposed new 49ers stadium}}
Plans were underway to construct a new 68,000-seat stadium at Candlestick Point.<ref>[http://www.49ers.com/pressbox/news_detail.php?PRKey=2033&section=PR%20News Official Site of the San Francisco 49ers - PR News<!-- Bot generated title -->]</ref> However, on November 8, 2006, the 49ers announced that they would abandon their search for a location in San Francisco and begin to actively pursue the idea of building a stadium in Santa Clara, California. As a result, San Francisco withdrew its bid for the 2016 Olympics on November 13, 2006, as its centerpiece stadium was lost. However, 49ers ownership continued to press forward; as a result of Santa Clara's approval of Measure J, construction of the new stadium was approved, and is slated to begin in 2012. It is unknown what will happen to Candlestick Park, although it will most likely be demolished once the 49ers move into the new stadium in 2014.
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Plans were underway to construct a new 68,000-seat stadium at Candlestick Point.<ref>[http://www.49ers.com/pressbox/news_detail.php?PRKey=2033&section=PR%20News Official Site of the San Francisco 49ers - PR News<!-- Bot generated title -->]</ref> However, on November 8, 2006, the 49ers announced that they would abandon their search for a location in San Francisco and begin to actively pursue the idea of building a stadium in Santa Clara, California. As a result, San Francisco withdrew its bid for the 2016 Olympics on November 13, 2006, as its centerpiece stadium was lost. However, 49ers ownership continued to press forward; as a result of Santa Clara's approval of Measure J, construction of the new stadium was approved, and is slated to begin in 2012. It is unknown what will happen to Candlestick Park, although it will most likely be demolished once the 49ers move into the new stadium in 2015.
   
 
==The Beatles' final concert==
 
==The Beatles' final concert==
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*[http://albums.phanfare.com/5406850/3047485#imageID=54912581 www.ballparks.phanfare.com photos and info about Candlestick park]
 
*[http://albums.phanfare.com/5406850/3047485#imageID=54912581 www.ballparks.phanfare.com photos and info about Candlestick park]
 
*[http://www.monsterpark.com/ Monster Park]—Former Official Site
 
*[http://www.monsterpark.com/ Monster Park]—Former Official Site
*[http://terraserver.microsoft.com/image.aspx?T=4&S=11&Z=10&X=1385&Y=10435&W=1&qs=%7csan+francisco%7cca%7c USGS aerial photograph showing football layout], a 2004 image from Microsoft's TerraServer-USA website
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*[http://terraserver.microsoft.com/image.aspx?T=4&S=11&Z=10&X=1385&Y=10435&W=1&qs=%7csan+francisco%7cca%7c USGS aerial photograph showing football layout], a 2004 image from Microsoft's [[TerraServer-USA]] website
 
[[Category:Stadiums]]
 
[[Category:Stadiums]]
 
[[Category:Defunct Major League Baseball ballparks]]
 
[[Category:Defunct Major League Baseball ballparks]]
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