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The following are the events that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball.

January

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15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

February

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15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29

March

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  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

April

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30

May

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

June

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30

July

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

August

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

September

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30

October

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

November

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30

December

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

Sources

1800s[]

  • 1871 - Joseph Jerome (Joe) McGinnity is born in Cornwall Township, Henry County, Illinois. A right handed pitcher, McGinnity gained notoriety by winning both ends of doubleheaders, and in 1903, he pulled off the feat three times in a single month, winning all six games. In a 10-season major league career, he amassed 246 wins, including 31 in 1903, 35 in 1904, and seven seasons with 20-plus wins. McGinnity will be elected to the Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1946.

1900s[]

1910s[]

1920s[]

1930s[]

1940s[]

  • 1940 - In an exhibition game that might be a spring training record of sorts, the Triple-A Kansas City Blues pound the Washington Senators, 22–5. The Blues collect 23 hits for 46 bases. Frenchy Bordagaray starts the scoring with a home run in the first inning; Jack Saltzgaver hit three triples in three at-bats with five RBI. Another familiar name, Johnny Lindell, yields three hits in three innings for the Blues.

1950s[]

1960s[]

  • 1965:
    • At age 38, Chicago Cubs radio announcer Jack Quinlan died in an auto accident during Cubs spring camp in Arizona. Quinlan was returning from a golf outing.
    • John Henry (Pop) Lloyd dies in Atlantic City, New Jersey, at the age of 80. Considered one of the best black players of the dead ball era, Lloyd was a line-drive hitter whose extraordinary skills at shortstop drew favorable comparisons to Honus Wagner. From 1906 through 1931 he played for 12 Negro League teams, primary with the New York Lincoln Giants. Lloyd later became a player-manager, and was given the affectionate nickname, "Pop," by the young players he mentored. Lloyd will be elected to the Hall of Fame by the by Negro Leagues Committee in 1977.

1970s[]

  • 1974 - In a five-player three-team deal involving the Cleveland Indians, Detroit Tigers, and New York Yankees, pitcher Jim Perry joins his pitching brother, Gaylord, in Cleveland. Detroit send Perry to Cleveland and Ed Farmer to the Yankees, who send Jerry Moses to Detroit, and Cleveland send Rick Sawyer and Walt Williams to the Yankees. The 1974 season will mark the Perrys’ first season as teammates during their major league careers.

1980s[]

  • 1981 - Toronto Blue Jays third baseman and All-American basketball player Danny Ainge drives the length of the court for a lay-up with two seconds to play, giving Brigham Young University a 51–50 upset victory over seventh-ranked University of Notre Dame in the NCAA East Regional semifinals. Ainge will hit .187 in 86 games for Toronto this season, retire, then sign to play for the NBA Boston Celtics.
  • 1989 - With outfielder Dave Winfield sidelined, the Yankees trade catcher Joel Skinner and a minor leaguer to the Indians for outfielder Mel Hall. Winfield will miss all of the 1989 season after undergoing back surgery next week for central disc herniation.

1990s[]

  • 1998 - Rupert Murdoch purchases the Los Angeles Dodgers from Peter O'Malley for a reported $311 million, the highest price ever paid for a US sports franchise.
  • 1999 - The career of New York Mets pitcher Paul Wilson is derailed again when he suffers a partially torn ligament in his pitching elbow while warming up before a three–inning stint in a minor-league game. An MRI will show a partial tear of the MCL in his elbow, and on March 30 he will undergo Tommy John surgery which will sideline him for the year.

2000s[]

  • 2001 - The San Diego Padres sign Rickey Henderson and send him to Triple-A to get in shape. For Henderson, it is his first time in the minors since a three-game rehabilitation 16 years ago.
  • 2005 - After avoiding salary arbitration by signing a one-year $10.5 million deal worth in the off season, Lance Berkman agrees to a six-year, $85 million contract with the Houston Astros. The three-time All-Star outfielder will be an Astro until 2010 with the club holding the option for an additional year.

Births[]

  • 1871 - Joe McGinnity, Hall of Fame pitcher (d. 1929)
  • 1884 - Clyde Engle, infielder/outfielder (d.1939)
  • 1887 - José Méndez, Hall of Fame Negro League player and manager (d. 1928)
  • 1894 - Bill Wambsganss, infielder (d. 1985)
  • 1908 - Gee Walker, All-Star outfielder (d. 1981)
  • 1927 - Richie Ashburn, Hall of Fame outfielder (d. 1997)
  • 1955 - Mike Norris, All-Star pitcher
  • 1962 - Ivan Calderón, All-Star outfielder (d. 2003)
  • 1974 - Jason LaRue, catcher
  • 1977 - Dave Ross, catcher
  • 1981 - José Castillo, infielder

Deaths[]

  • 1902 - Tom Burns, infielder (b. 1857)
  • 1926 - Bill Hutchison, pitcher (b. 1859)
  • 1928 - Tom Lovett, pitcher (d. 1928)
  • 1965 - Pop Lloyd, Hall of Fame Negro League infielder (b. 1884)
  • 1965 - Jack Quinlan, sportscaster (b. 1928)
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