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{{This date in baseball history}}
 
{{This date in baseball history}}
 
 
==1800s==
 
==1800s==
*[[1876]] - [[Ross Barnes]] of the Chicago White Stockings hit the first [[home run]] in major league history off the Cincinnati Red Stockings' [[Cherokee Fisher]]. According to the ''[[Chicago Tribune]]'', "Barnes, coming to bat with two men out, made the finest hit of the game straight down the left field to the carriages, for a clean home run." [http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0156011549?p=S00O]
+
*[[1876]] - [[Ross Barnes]] of the Chicago White Stockings hit the first [[home run]] in major league history off the Cincinnati Red Stockings' [[Cherokee Fisher]]. According to the ''[[Chicago Tribune]]'', "Barnes, coming to bat with two men out, made the finest hit of the game straight down the left field to the carriages, for a clean home run." [http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0156011549?p=S00O]
   
 
==1900s==
 
==1900s==
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==1920s==
 
==1920s==
*[[1920]] - The first game in the history of the [[negro league baseball|Negro National League]] was played. The Indianapolis ABCs hosted the Chicago American Giants, managed by [[Rube Foster]]. The ABCs, featuring [[Oscar Charleston]], won the game, 4–2.
+
*[[1920]] - The first game in the history of the [[negro league baseball|Negro National League]] was played. The Indianapolis ABCs hosted the Chicago American Giants, managed by [[Rube Foster]]. The ABCs, featuring [[Oscar Charleston]], won the game, 4–2.
+
*[[1923]] - [[Walter Johnson]] recorded his first [[shutout]] of the season and the 100th of his major league record 113 career shutouts as the [[Minnesota Twins|Washington Senators]] defeated the [[New York Yankees]] 3–0. Yankees [[shortstop]] [[Everett Scott]] received a medal from the [[American League]] for playing in his 1,000th consecutive game.
*[[1923]] - [[Walter Johnson]] recorded his first [[shutout]] of the season and the 100th of his major league record 113 career shutouts as the [[Minnesota Twins|Washington Senators]] defeated the [[New York Yankees]] 3–0. Yankees [[shortstop]] [[Everett Scott]] received a medal from the [[American League]] for playing in his 1,000th consecutive game.
 
 
 
==1930s==
 
==1930s==
*[[1939]] - [[Lou Gehrig]] of the [[New York Yankees]] did not play against the [[Detroit Tigers]] at [[Briggs Stadium]], ending at 2,130 his streak of consecutive [[games played]]. An ailing Gehrig removed himself from the lineup, telling his [[manager (baseball)|manager]] [[Joe McCarthy (baseball)|Joe McCarthy]] that he could not play because of continuing weakness. Doctors will later diagnose Gehrig with [[amyotrophic lateral sclerosis]], a fatal disease that affects the muscles. Gehrig will never play again.
+
*[[1939]] - [[Lou Gehrig]] of the [[New York Yankees]] did not play against the [[Detroit Tigers]] at [[Briggs Stadium]], ending at 2,130 his streak of consecutive [[games played]]. An ailing Gehrig removed himself from the lineup, telling his [[manager (baseball)|manager]] [[Joe McCarthy (baseball)|Joe McCarthy]] that he could not play because of continuing weakness. Doctors will later diagnose Gehrig with [[amyotrophic lateral sclerosis]], a fatal disease that affects the muscles. Gehrig will never play again.
 
 
==1940s==
 
==1940s==
*[[1943]] - [[Philadelphia Phillies]] pitcher [[Schoolboy Rowe]] pinch hits with the bases loaded in the sixth inning and cracks a grand slam off [[Atlanta Braves|Boston Braves]]' [[Al Javery]] to break a tie. The Phillies win, 6–5, but it takes them 12 innings. For Rowe, it is his second career grand slam. He hit one in 1939 while with [[Detroit Tigers|Detroit]], as he is the only pitcher in major league history to hit a grand slam in each league. Rowe will finish the 1943 season with a .306 batting average as a pinch hitter.
+
*[[1943]] - [[Philadelphia Phillies]] pitcher [[Schoolboy Rowe]] pinch hits with the bases loaded in the sixth inning and cracks a grand slam off [[Atlanta Braves|Boston Braves]]' [[Al Javery]] to break a tie. The Phillies win, 6–5, but it takes them 12 innings. For Rowe, it is his second career grand slam. He hit one in 1939 while with [[Detroit Tigers|Detroit]], as he is the only pitcher in major league history to hit a grand slam in each league. Rowe will finish the 1943 season with a .306 batting average as a pinch hitter.
+
*[[1944]] - [[Charley Schanz]] of the [[Philadelphia Phillies]] takes a 1–0 [[no-hitter]] into the seventh inning before giving up a two-run home run to [[Joe Medwick]] of the [[San Francisco Giants|New York Giants]], the only Giants' hit of the day. Schanz wins his own game by clearing the bases with a triple in the ninth.
*[[1944]] - [[Charley Schanz]] of the [[Philadelphia Phillies]] takes a 1–0 [[no-hitter]] into the seventh inning before giving up a two-run home run to [[Joe Medwick]] of the [[San Francisco Giants|New York Giants]], the only Giants' hit of the day. Schanz wins his own game by clearing the bases with a triple in the ninth.
+
*[[1947]] - At [[Cleveland Stadium]], [[Bob Feller]] fires his second one-hitter in 10 days, stopping the [[Boston Red Sox]], 2–0, while striking out 10. [[Johnny Pesky]] has the only hit for Boston. [[Joe Gordon (baseball player)|Joe Gordon]]'s home run off [[Dave Ferriss]] is the only run Feller needs.
 
*[[1947]] - At [[Cleveland Stadium]], [[Bob Feller]] fires his second one-hitter in 10 days, stopping the [[Boston Red Sox]], 2–0, while striking out 10. [[Johnny Pesky]] has the only hit for Boston. [[Joe Gordon (baseball player)|Joe Gordon]]'s home run off [[Dave Ferriss]] is the only run Feller needs.
 
 
 
*[[1949]] - In his first major league start, [[Don Newcombe]] of the [[Los Angeles Dodgers|Brooklyn Dodgers]] shuts out the [[Cincinnati Reds]], 3–0.
 
*[[1949]] - In his first major league start, [[Don Newcombe]] of the [[Los Angeles Dodgers|Brooklyn Dodgers]] shuts out the [[Cincinnati Reds]], 3–0.
   
 
==1950s==
 
==1950s==
*[[1953]] - [[Pittsburgh Pirates]] [[outfielder]] [[Carlos Bernier]] hit three consecutive [[triple (baseball)|triples]] in a 12–4 win over the [[Cincinnati Reds|Cincinnatt Redlegs]]. Bernier added a [[single (baseball)|single]] and a [[stolen base]] as [[Ralph Kiner]] and [[Jim Greengrass]] matched [[home run]]s. In a stretch of 11 [[at bat]]s, Bernier will hit four triples, two [[double (baseball)|doubles]], and two singles.
+
*[[1953]] - [[Pittsburgh Pirates]] [[outfielder]] [[Carlos Bernier]] hit three consecutive [[triple (baseball)|triples]] in a 12–4 win over the [[Cincinnati Reds|Cincinnatt Redlegs]]. Bernier added a [[single (baseball)|single]] and a [[stolen base]] as [[Ralph Kiner]] and [[Jim Greengrass]] matched [[home run]]s. In a stretch of 11 [[at bat]]s, Bernier will hit four triples, two [[double (baseball)|doubles]], and two singles.
+
*[[1954]] - [[Stan Musial]] of the [[St. Louis Cardinals]] hit five [[home run]]s in a doubleheader split against the [[San Francisco Giants|New York Giants]]. The Cardinals won the first game 10–6 but lost the second 9–7. In a strange twist, one of the fans in attendance at [[Sportsman's Park]] is a young boy named [[Nate Colbert]]. In 1966, Colbert will make his major league debut. Six years later, he will tie Musial’s record by hitting five home runs in a doubleheader.
*[[1954]] - [[Stan Musial]] of the [[St. Louis Cardinals]] hit five [[home run]]s in a doubleheader split against the [[San Francisco Giants|New York Giants]]. The Cardinals won the first game 10–6 but lost the second 9–7. In a strange twist, one of the fans in attendance at [[Sportsman's Park]] is a young boy named [[Nate Colbert]]. In 1966, Colbert will make his major league debut. Six years later, he will tie Musial’s record by hitting five home runs in a doubleheader.
+
*[[1955]] - At [[Ebbets Field]], [[Carl Furillo]] hit his sixth [[home run]] of the season with [[Jackie Robinson]] on base in the 12th inning to give the [[Los Angeles Dodgers|Brooklyn Dodgers]] a 2–0 victory over the [[Atlanta Braves|Milwaukee Braves]]. [[Carl Erskine]] [[win (baseball)|won]] his fourth game in a row, beating [[Gene Conley]], as both pitchers posted [[complete game]]s.
+
*[[1956]] - At [[Wrigley Field]], the [[San Francisco Giants|New York Giants]] (25) and [[Chicago Cubs]] (23) set a major league record with 48 players on the field in a 17-inning marathon finally won by the visiting Giants, 6–5. The two teams combined to intentionally [[base on balls|walk]] 11 batters, also a record, with the Cubs contributing seven of the free passes. Losing [[pitcher]] [[Jim Brosnan]] chipped in with four walks, all intentional. Cubs [[third baseman]] [[Don Hoak]] was not one of the strollers, as he set a [[National League]] record with six [[strikeout]]s, all against different pitchers, while [[Ernie Banks]], [[Willie Mays]] and [[Wes Westrum]] were twice walked intentionally. [[Whitey Lockman]] started in [[left field]], switched to [[first base]], returned to LF, and finished at 1B. Ex-Giants [[Monte Irvin]] is 0-for-5 against five pitchers. The game is six minutes shy of the 5:19 record set by the [[Los Angeles Dodgers|Dodgers]]-[[Atlanta Braves|Braves]] in 20 innings in 1940.
*[[1955]] - At [[Ebbets Field]], [[Carl Furillo]] hit his sixth [[home run]] of the season with [[Jackie Robinson]] on base in the 12th inning to give the [[Los Angeles Dodgers|Brooklyn Dodgers]] a 2–0 victory over the [[Atlanta Braves|Milwaukee Braves]]. [[Carl Erskine]] [[win (baseball)|won]] his fourth game in a row, beating [[Gene Conley]], as both pitchers posted [[complete game]]s.
 
 
*[[1956]] - At [[Wrigley Field]], the [[San Francisco Giants|New York Giants]] (25) and [[Chicago Cubs]] (23) set a major league record with 48 players on the field in a 17-inning marathon finally won by the visiting Giants, 6–5. The two teams combined to intentionally [[base on balls|walk]] 11 batters, also a record, with the Cubs contributing seven of the free passes. Losing [[pitcher]] [[Jim Brosnan]] chipped in with four walks, all intentional. Cubs [[third baseman]] [[Don Hoak]] was not one of the strollers, as he set a [[National League]] record with six [[strikeout]]s, all against different pitchers, while [[Ernie Banks]], [[Willie Mays]] and [[Wes Westrum]] were twice walked intentionally. [[Whitey Lockman]] started in [[left field]], switched to [[first base]], returned to LF, and finished at 1B. Ex-Giants [[Monte Irvin]] is 0-for-5 against five pitchers. The game is six minutes shy of the 5:19 record set by the [[Los Angeles Dodgers|Dodgers]]-[[Atlanta Braves|Braves]] in 20 innings in 1940.
 
 
 
*[[1959]] - [[Frank Robinson]] of the [[Cincinnati Reds]] [[hitting for the cycle|hit for the cycle]], in a 16–4 rout of the [[Los Angeles Dodgers|Dodgers]].
 
*[[1959]] - [[Frank Robinson]] of the [[Cincinnati Reds]] [[hitting for the cycle|hit for the cycle]], in a 16–4 rout of the [[Los Angeles Dodgers|Dodgers]].
   
 
==1960s==
 
==1960s==
*[[1960]] - The [[Birmingham Barons|Birmingham]] and [[Memphis]] teams set a [[Southern League (baseball)|Southern League]] record by hitting 11 [[home runs]]in one game. With Russwood Park unavailable due to a fire, a temporary park proves especially inviting for home runs. Six of the home runs clear the right-field fence, which is only 204 feet from [[home plate]].
+
*[[1960]] - The [[Birmingham Barons|Birmingham]] and [[Memphis]] teams set a [[Southern League (baseball)|Southern League]] record by hitting 11 [[home runs]]in one game. With Russwood Park unavailable due to a fire, a temporary park proves especially inviting for home runs. Six of the home runs clear the right-field fence, which is only 204 feet from [[home plate]].
+
*[[1964]] - At [[Municipal Stadium (Kansas City)|Municipal Stadium]] in [[Kansas City, Missouri|Kansas City]], the visiting [[Minnesota Twins]] hit four consecutive [[home run]]s in one inning. [[Tony Oliva]], [[Bob Allison]], [[Jimmie Hall]], and [[Harmon Killebrew]] go deep in the 11th inning to defeat the [[Oakland Athletics|Athletics]], 7–3.
*[[1964]] - At [[Municipal Stadium (Kansas City)|Municipal Stadium]] in [[Kansas City, Missouri|Kansas City]], the visiting [[Minnesota Twins]] hit four consecutive [[home run]]s in one inning. [[Tony Oliva]], [[Bob Allison]], [[Jimmie Hall]], and [[Harmon Killebrew]] go deep in the 11th inning to defeat the [[Oakland Athletics|Athletics]], 7–3.
 
 
 
*[[1969]] - [[Al Lopez]] resigned as [[manager (baseball)|manager]] of the [[Chicago White Sox]] due to health reasons. Lopez, who left the game with 840 [[win (baseball)|wins]] and two [[American League]] pennants, is replaced by [[Don Gutteridge]].
 
*[[1969]] - [[Al Lopez]] resigned as [[manager (baseball)|manager]] of the [[Chicago White Sox]] due to health reasons. Lopez, who left the game with 840 [[win (baseball)|wins]] and two [[American League]] pennants, is replaced by [[Don Gutteridge]].
   
 
==1970s==
 
==1970s==
*[[1972]] - The long holdout of [[Oakland Athletics]] [[MLB All-Star Game|All-Star]] [[pitcher]] [[Vida Blue]] came to an end. Blue, who won the both the [[MLB Most Valuable Player Award|American League MVP]] and [[Cy Young Award|Cy Young]] awards in 1971, agreed to sign a contract for $63,000, after balking at owner [[Charlie Finley]]’s previous offers. Perhaps affected by the long layoff, Blue will win only six games in 1972.
+
*[[1972]] - The long holdout of [[Oakland Athletics]] [[MLB All-Star Game|All-Star]] [[pitcher]] [[Vida Blue]] came to an end. Blue, who won the both the [[MLB Most Valuable Player Award|American League MVP]] and [[Cy Young Award|Cy Young]] awards in 1971, agreed to sign a contract for $63,000, after balking at owner [[Charlie Finley]]’s previous offers. Perhaps affected by the long layoff, Blue will win only six games in 1972.
 
 
*[[1976]] - [[José Cardenal]] hit 6-for-7 with four [[run batted in|RBI]], including a [[double (baseball)|double]] and a [[home run]], as the [[Chicago Cubs|Cubs]] defeated the [[San Francisco Giants|Giants]], 6–5, in the 14-inning first game of a doubleheader.
 
*[[1976]] - [[José Cardenal]] hit 6-for-7 with four [[run batted in|RBI]], including a [[double (baseball)|double]] and a [[home run]], as the [[Chicago Cubs|Cubs]] defeated the [[San Francisco Giants|Giants]], 6–5, in the 14-inning first game of a doubleheader.
   
 
==1980s==
 
==1980s==
*[[1984]] - [[LaMarr Hoyt]] faced 27 batters in a 3–0, one-hitter [[shutout]] against the [[New York Yankees]]. [[Don Mattingly]] had the only hit for New York, an opposite-field blooper in the seventh inning, which is followed by a [[double play]].
+
*[[1984]] - [[LaMarr Hoyt]] faced 27 batters in a 3–0, one-hitter [[shutout]] against the [[New York Yankees]]. [[Don Mattingly]] had the only hit for New York, an opposite-field blooper in the seventh inning, which is followed by a [[double play]].
 
 
*[[1987]]:
 
*[[1987]]:
**After having missed [[spring training]], [[Montreal Expos]] [[outfielder]] [[Tim Raines]] debuted going 4-for-5, including a 10th-inning [[grand slam (baseball)|grand slam]], in an 11–7 win over the [[New York Mets]].
+
**After having missed [[spring training]], [[Montreal Expos]] [[outfielder]] [[Tim Raines]] debuted going 4-for-5, including a 10th-inning [[grand slam (baseball)|grand slam]], in an 11–7 win over the [[New York Mets]].
 
**[[Graig Nettles]] and [[Dion James]] each hit grand slams to lead the [[Atlanta Braves]] to a 12–4 rout of the [[Houston Astros]]. It is the first time since July 3, 1966 (when [[pitcher]] [[Tony Cloninger]] did it by himself), that the Braves have hit two grand slams in one game.
 
**[[Graig Nettles]] and [[Dion James]] each hit grand slams to lead the [[Atlanta Braves]] to a 12–4 rout of the [[Houston Astros]]. It is the first time since July 3, 1966 (when [[pitcher]] [[Tony Cloninger]] did it by himself), that the Braves have hit two grand slams in one game.
   
 
==1990s==
 
==1990s==
*[[1992]] - [[New York Yankees]] [[pitcher]] [[Scott Sanderson]] became the 12th pitcher in major league history to surrender four [[home run]]s in a single inning. Sanderson was rocked in the fifth inning of the game against the [[Minnesota Twins]] by [[Shane Mack]], [[Kirby Puckett]], [[Kent Hrbek]], and [[Randy Bush]]. The Twins need all the homers as they won, 7–6.
+
*[[1992]] - [[New York Yankees]] [[pitcher]] [[Scott Sanderson]] became the 12th pitcher in major league history to surrender four [[home run]]s in a single inning. Sanderson was rocked in the fifth inning of the game against the [[Minnesota Twins]] by [[Shane Mack]], [[Kirby Puckett]], [[Kent Hrbek]], and [[Randy Bush]]. The Twins need all the homers as they won, 7–6.
+
*[[1993]] - [[Texas Rangers (baseball)|Texas]] defeated the [[Milwaukee Brewers|Brewers]], 13–2, collecting 15 hits. [[José Canseco]] hit a [[single (baseball)|single]], [[double (baseball)|double]] and [[home run]] before leaving for a [[pinch runner]]. Protecting a 12–2 lead, [[Jeff Bronkey]] pitched three innings in [[relief pitcher|relief]] of [[Robb Nen]], and earned a [[save (sport)|save]] in his major league debut with Texas. Bronkey is the first major leaguer born in [[Afghanistan]].
*[[1993]] - [[Texas Rangers (baseball)|Texas]] defeated the [[Milwaukee Brewers|Brewers]], 13–2, collecting 15 hits. [[José Canseco]] hit a [[single (baseball)|single]], [[double (baseball)|double]] and [[home run]] before leaving for a [[pinch runner]]. Protecting a 12–2 lead, [[Jeff Bronkey]] pitched three innings in [[relief pitcher|relief]] of [[Robb Nen]], and earned a [[save (sport)|save]] in his major league debut with Texas. Bronkey is the first major leaguer born in [[Afghanistan]].
 
 
 
*[[1995]]:
 
*[[1995]]:
**[[Hideo Nomo]] of the [[Los Angeles Dodgers]] became the first [[Japan]]ese native to play in the majors in three decades. Nomo pitched five scoreless innings of one-hit ball, but the Dodgers blew a 3–0 lead and lost to {{san Francisco Giants|San Francisco]] 4–3.
+
**[[Hideo Nomo]] of the [[Los Angeles Dodgers]] became the first [[Japan]]ese native to play in the majors in three decades. Nomo pitched five scoreless innings of one-hit ball, but the Dodgers blew a 3–0 lead and lost to {{san Francisco Giants|San Francisco]] 4–3.
**The [[Boston Red Sox|Red Sox]] defeat the [[New York Yankees|Yankees]], 8–0, scoring its runs on [[grand slam (baseball)|grand slams]] in back-to-back innings by former college teammates [[John Valentin]] and [[Mo Vaughn]]. According to ''[[Society for American Baseball Research|SABR]]'' statistician [[David Vincent]], it is the first time ever that two grand slams account for all the runs scored in a major league game.
+
**The [[Boston Red Sox|Red Sox]] defeat the [[New York Yankees|Yankees]], 8–0, scoring its runs on [[grand slam (baseball)|grand slams]] in back-to-back innings by former college teammates [[John Valentin]] and [[Mo Vaughn]]. According to ''[[Society for American Baseball Research|SABR]]'' statistician [[David Vincent]], it is the first time ever that two grand slams account for all the runs scored in a major league game.
+
*[[1998]] - [[New York Yankees]] [[pitcher]]s [[Roger Clemens]] (seven innings) and [[Paul Quantrill]] (two innings) combined to one-hit the [[Oakland Athletics]], 7–0. Oakland's only hit is a [[single (baseball)|single]] by [[rookie]] [[Ben Grieve]].
*[[1998]] - [[New York Yankees]] [[pitcher]]s [[Roger Clemens]] (seven innings) and [[Paul Quantrill]] (two innings) combined to one-hit the [[Oakland Athletics]], 7–0. Oakland's only hit is a [[single (baseball)|single]] by [[rookie]] [[Ben Grieve]].
 
   
 
*[[1999]] - [[Texas Rangers (baseball)|Texas Rangers]] [[designated hitter|DH]] [[Rafael Palmeiro]] had three hits, including his [[List of major league players with 2,000 hits|2,000th]], and [[Juan González]] belted his third [[home run]] in three games as Texas won over the [[Cleveland Indians]], 8–6.
 
*[[1999]] - [[Texas Rangers (baseball)|Texas Rangers]] [[designated hitter|DH]] [[Rafael Palmeiro]] had three hits, including his [[List of major league players with 2,000 hits|2,000th]], and [[Juan González]] belted his third [[home run]] in three games as Texas won over the [[Cleveland Indians]], 8–6.
   
==2000s==
+
==2000s==
 
*[[2000]]:
 
*[[2000]]:
**The [[Atlanta Braves]] became the first [[National League]] team in 49 years to win 15 straight games by defeating [[Los Angeles Dodgers]] 5–3. The last team to do so was the 1951 [[San Francisco Giants|New York Giants]]. The Braves' streak will end tomorrow.
+
**The [[Atlanta Braves]] became the first [[National League]] team in 49 years to win 15 straight games by defeating [[Los Angeles Dodgers]] 5–3. The last team to do so was the 1951 [[San Francisco Giants|New York Giants]]. The Braves' streak will end tomorrow.
**In [[Kerry Wood]]'s comeback game following surgery, the fireballer set down the [[Houston Astros]] for six innings, allowing three hits and one run. The [[Chicago Cubs]] made it easy for Wood, scoring 10 runs in the first five innings. Wood helped himself with one of three Cubs [[home run]]s.
+
**In [[Kerry Wood]]'s comeback game following surgery, the fireballer set down the [[Houston Astros]] for six innings, allowing three hits and one run. The [[Chicago Cubs]] made it easy for Wood, scoring 10 runs in the first five innings. Wood helped himself with one of three Cubs [[home run]]s.
**The [[Kansas City Royals]] scored three runs in the 10th inning to defeat the [[Oakland Athletics]], 8–7. Oakland [[closer]] [[Jason Isringhausen]], who was 14-for-14 in career [[save (sport)|saves]], was two outs away from tying the major league mark for consecutive saves to start a career.
+
**The [[Kansas City Royals]] scored three runs in the 10th inning to defeat the [[Oakland Athletics]], 8–7. Oakland [[closer]] [[Jason Isringhausen]], who was 14-for-14 in career [[save (sport)|saves]], was two outs away from tying the major league mark for consecutive saves to start a career.
 
 
*[[2001]] - The [[Atlanta Braves|Braves]] beat the [[Milwaukee Brewers|Brewers]], 1–0, as [[Greg Maddux]] hurls a two-hitter and [[strikeout|strikes out]] a career high 14, including eight of the last 10 batters he faces. It is his 100th [[complete game]], as [[B.J. Surhoff]]'s solo [[home run]] in the third inning off [[Paul Rigdon]] is the only run he needs.
 
*[[2001]] - The [[Atlanta Braves|Braves]] beat the [[Milwaukee Brewers|Brewers]], 1–0, as [[Greg Maddux]] hurls a two-hitter and [[strikeout|strikes out]] a career high 14, including eight of the last 10 batters he faces. It is his 100th [[complete game]], as [[B.J. Surhoff]]'s solo [[home run]] in the third inning off [[Paul Rigdon]] is the only run he needs.
+
*[[2002]] - [[Mike Cameron]] hit four [[home run]]s and came close to a record-setting fifth in leading the [[Seattle Mariners]] to a 15–4 victory over the [[Chicago White Sox]]. Cameron is only the 13th player in major league history to [[MLB hitters with four home runs in one game|homer four times in a game]]. He connected in his first four [[at-bat]]s in just five innings as he joined [[Bret Boone]] as the first teammates to hit two home runs in the same inning. They connected back-to-back twice in a 10-run first.
*[[2002]] - [[Mike Cameron]] hit four [[home run]]s and came close to a record-setting fifth in leading the [[Seattle Mariners]] to a 15–4 victory over the [[Chicago White Sox]]. Cameron is only the 13th player in major league history to [[MLB hitters with four home runs in one game|homer four times in a game]]. He connected in his first four [[at-bat]]s in just five innings as he joined [[Bret Boone]] as the first teammates to hit two home runs in the same inning. They connected back-to-back twice in a 10-run first.
+
*[[2005]] - [[Jim Edmonds]] hit a three-run [[home run]] off [[closer]] [[Danny Graves]], and [[John Mabry]] added a two-run homer that completed the greatest ninth-inning comeback in [[St. Louis Cardinals]] history. The Cardinals sent 12 batters to the plate and scored seven runs in the top of the ninth to beat [[Cincinnati Reds|Cincinnati]] 10–9.
 
*[[2005]] - [[Jim Edmonds]] hit a three-run [[home run]] off [[closer]] [[Danny Graves]], and [[John Mabry]] added a two-run homer that completed the greatest ninth-inning comeback in [[St. Louis Cardinals]] history. The Cardinals sent 12 batters to the plate and scored seven runs in the top of the ninth to beat [[Cincinnati Reds|Cincinnati]] 10–9.
 
 
 
*[[2006]]:
 
*[[2006]]:
**At [[Wrigley Field]], [[Zach Duke]] of the [[Pittsburgh Pirates]] pitched a five-hitter for his first [[complete game]] and [[shutout]] in the Pirates 8–0 win victory over the [[Chicago Cubs]].
+
**At [[Wrigley Field]], [[Zach Duke]] of the [[Pittsburgh Pirates]] pitched a five-hitter for his first [[complete game]] and [[shutout]] in the Pirates 8–0 win victory over the [[Chicago Cubs]].
 
**[[Fernando Nieve]] collected his first [[win (baseball)|win]], [[hit (baseball)|hit]] and [[run batted in|RBI]] as a big leaguer, and the [[Houston Astros]] roughed up [[Milwaukee Brewers|Milwaukee]] ace [[Ben Sheets]] in an 8–5 victory. Nieve, who retired 14 in a row at one point, gave up four runs and six hits with seven [[strikeout]]s in seven innings. The 23-year-old [[Venezuela]]n signed with the Astros in May 1999, when he was 16, and made his major league debut earlier this season.
 
**[[Fernando Nieve]] collected his first [[win (baseball)|win]], [[hit (baseball)|hit]] and [[run batted in|RBI]] as a big leaguer, and the [[Houston Astros]] roughed up [[Milwaukee Brewers|Milwaukee]] ace [[Ben Sheets]] in an 8–5 victory. Nieve, who retired 14 in a row at one point, gave up four runs and six hits with seven [[strikeout]]s in seven innings. The 23-year-old [[Venezuela]]n signed with the Astros in May 1999, when he was 16, and made his major league debut earlier this season.
  +
*[[2012]] - [[Jered Weaver]] throws a [[no-hitter]] against the [[Minnesota Twins]].
   
 
==Births==
 
==Births==

Latest revision as of 19:03, August 8, 2012

The following are the events that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball.

January

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

February

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29

March

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

April

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30

May

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

June

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30

July

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

August

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

September

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30

October

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

November

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30

December

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

  8   9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

Sources

1800sEdit

  • 1876 - Ross Barnes of the Chicago White Stockings hit the first home run in major league history off the Cincinnati Red Stockings' Cherokee Fisher. According to the Chicago Tribune, "Barnes, coming to bat with two men out, made the finest hit of the game straight down the left field to the carriages, for a clean home run." [1]

1900sEdit

  • 1909 - Honus Wagner stole his way around the bases in the first inning of a game against the Cubs. It was the fourth time he stole second base, third and home in a same inning, an National League record. Previously, Wagner performed this feat in 1899, 1902 and 1907. The record holder in the American League is Ty Cobb, in 1909, 1911, 1912 and 1924. Through the 2005 season, not one player in major league history has ever accomplished this feat once in each league and only two more have accomplished the feat twice during their careers: Max Carey (NL) and Jackie Tavener (AL). [2]

1910sEdit

1920sEdit

1930sEdit

1940sEdit

1950sEdit

1960sEdit

1970sEdit

1980sEdit

1990sEdit

2000sEdit

BirthsEdit

DeathsEdit

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