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{{otheruses4|the [[Baseball Hall of Fame|Hall of Fame]] pitcher|the annual award given out for the top left-handed pitcher in the majors|Warren Spahn Award}}
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{{otheruses4|the [[Baseball Hall of Fame|Hall of Fame]] pitcher|the annual award given out for the top left-handed pitcher in the majors|Warren Spahn Award}}
 
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'''Warren Edward Spahn''' ([[April 23]], [[1921]] – [[November 24]], [[2003]]) was an [[United States|American]] left-handed [[pitcher]] in [[Major League Baseball]] who played for 21 seasons, all in the [[National League]]. Although never quite as dominating as some, he was both astonishingly consistent and durable. He won 20 games in 13 different seasons, and compiled a 23-7 record when he was aged 42. He won more games than any other left-handed pitcher, or any other pitcher who played his entire career in the post-[[1920]] [[live-ball era]], and is acknowledged as one of the greatest left-handed pitchers in Major League Baseball history. Spahn was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the BBWAA in 1973 in his first year of eligibility (His eligibility had been delayed, under the rules of the day, by 2 seasons of brief minor league service.) He received a surprisingly low 83% of the Hall of Fame vote - in view of his achievements. Several other pitchers have receover 90%.
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'''Warren Edward Spahn''' ([[April 23]], [[1921]] – [[November 24]], [[2003]]) was an [[United States|American]] left-handed [[pitcher]] in [[Major League Baseball]] who played for 21 seasons, all in the [[National League]]. Although never quite as dominating as some, he was both astonishingly consistent and durable. He won 20 games in 13 different seasons, and compiled a 23-7 record when he was aged 42. He won more games than any other left-handed pitcher, or any other pitcher who played his entire career in the post-[[1920]] [[live-ball era]], and is acknowledged as one of the greatest left-handed pitchers in Major League Baseball history.
   
 
Spahn threw in the old windmill style, a big arm pump, swinging both hands behind his head, followed with an extremely high leg kick and a straight overhand delivery. He threw a variety of pitches but his fastball was his best pitch as he could throw it with varying velocities and great control.
 
Spahn threw in the old windmill style, a big arm pump, swinging both hands behind his head, followed with an extremely high leg kick and a straight overhand delivery. He threw a variety of pitches but his fastball was his best pitch as he could throw it with varying velocities and great control.
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==Baseball Career==
 
==Baseball Career==
{{MLB HoF}} Spahn was born in [[Buffalo, New York]]. In [[1940]] he signed with the [[Atlanta Braves|Braves]] organization. His major league career began in [[1942]]. Spahn was one of the greatest lefthanded pitchers of all-time. He played the majority of his career with the [[Atlanta Braves|Braves]], moving with the team from Boston to Milwaukee. Spahn finished in the top five in Cy Young voting 5 times while winning it only once. He was selected for the All-Star in 14 seasons. He was not an overpowering pitcher for most of his career after knees problems took much of the velocity away from his fastball. However he was one of the smartest pitchers in the league. Whitlow Wyatt, the pitching coach for the Braves, said, "He makes my job easy. Every pitch he throws has an idea behind it." He easily holds the record for most 20 win seasons in the live-ball era with 13. [[Lefty Grove]] and [[Jim Palmer]] had 8, and [[Bob Lemon]] and [[Ferguson]] Jenkins had 7. Spahn is one of three pitchers to win 300 games without striking out more than 200 in any one season. The others are [[Tom Glavine]] and [[Early Wynn]].
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{{MLB HoF}} Spahn was born in [[Buffalo, New York]]. In [[1940]] he signed with the [[Atlanta Braves|Braves]] organization. His major league career began in [[1942]]. Spahn was one of the greatest lefthanded pitchers of all-time. He played the majority of his career with the [[Atlanta Braves|Braves]], moving with the team from Boston to Milwaukee. Spahn finished in the top five in Cy Young voting 5 times while winning it only once. He was selected for the All-Star in 14 seasons. He was not an overpowering pitcher for most of his career after knees problems took much of the velocity away from his fastball. However he was one of the smartest pitchers in the league. Whitlow Wyatt, the pitching coach for the Braves, said, "He makes my job easy. Every pitch he throws has an idea behind it." Spahn was elected to join the Hall of Fame in [[1973]]. He easily holds the record for most 20 win seasons in the live-ball era with 13. [[Lefty Grove]] and [[Jim Palmer]] had 8, and [[Bob Lemon]] and [[Ferguson]] Jenkins had 7. Spahn is one of three pitchers to win 300 games without striking out more than 200 in any one season. The others are [[Tom Glavine]] and [[Early Wynn]].
   
 
Spahn also threw two [[no-hitter]]s, won 3 [[Earned run average|ERA]] titles, appeared in 14 [[Major League Baseball All-Star Game|All-Star games]], and holds the National League record for career [[home run]]s by a pitcher with 35. Spahn led the [[National League]] in [[win (baseball)|wins]] eight times, including five seasons in a row (1949, 1950, 1953, 1957-1961) and complete games nine seasons, seven consecutively (1949, 1951, 1957-63); these numbers are major league records. He won the Major League [[Cy Young Award]] in [[1957]] and had the award been given would have likely won it in 1947 and 1951 as well.
 
Spahn also threw two [[no-hitter]]s, won 3 [[Earned run average|ERA]] titles, appeared in 14 [[Major League Baseball All-Star Game|All-Star games]], and holds the National League record for career [[home run]]s by a pitcher with 35. Spahn led the [[National League]] in [[win (baseball)|wins]] eight times, including five seasons in a row (1949, 1950, 1953, 1957-1961) and complete games nine seasons, seven consecutively (1949, 1951, 1957-63); these numbers are major league records. He won the Major League [[Cy Young Award]] in [[1957]] and had the award been given would have likely won it in 1947 and 1951 as well.
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On July 2, [[1963]]. Facing the San Francisco Giants, the 42-year-old Spahn became locked into a pitchers' duel with 25-year-old [[Juan Marichal]]. The score was still 0-0 after more than four hours when Willie Mays hit a game-winning solo home run off Spahn with one out in the bottom of the 16th inning. Marichal's manager, [[Alvin Dark]], visited the mound in the 9th, 10th, 11th, 13th, and 14th innings, and was talked out of removing Marichal each time. During the 14th-inning visit, Marichal told Dark, "Do you see that man pitching for the other side? Do you know that man is 42 years old? I'm only 25. If that man is on the mound, nobody is going to take me out of here." Marichal ended up throwing 227 pitches in the complete game 1-0 win, while Spahn threw 201 in the loss, allowing nine hits and one walk.
 
On July 2, [[1963]]. Facing the San Francisco Giants, the 42-year-old Spahn became locked into a pitchers' duel with 25-year-old [[Juan Marichal]]. The score was still 0-0 after more than four hours when Willie Mays hit a game-winning solo home run off Spahn with one out in the bottom of the 16th inning. Marichal's manager, [[Alvin Dark]], visited the mound in the 9th, 10th, 11th, 13th, and 14th innings, and was talked out of removing Marichal each time. During the 14th-inning visit, Marichal told Dark, "Do you see that man pitching for the other side? Do you know that man is 42 years old? I'm only 25. If that man is on the mound, nobody is going to take me out of here." Marichal ended up throwing 227 pitches in the complete game 1-0 win, while Spahn threw 201 in the loss, allowing nine hits and one walk.
   
In 1964, as the league’s oldest player, Spahn’s age began to show. He won a career low 6 games with a career high 5.29 ERA in 1964 and was demoted to the bullpen. After the season he was sold to the Mets who would release him in July of 1965 after a 4-12 record. The Giants signed him and Spahn went to the west coast, pitching his final major league games in a Giants uniform. In his last major league game, he passed Bob Feller in career strikeouts. Spahn played for Casey Stengel in his rookie year with the Boston Braves (4 games) in 1942 and in his the first half of his final season in 1965. Spahn claimed that he played for Stengel "before and after Casey was a genius."
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In 1964, as the league’s oldest player, Spahn’s age began to show. He won a career low 6 games with a career high 5.29 ERA in 1964 and was demoted to the bullpen. After the season he was sold to the Mets who would release him in July of 1965 after a 4-12 record. The Giants signed him and Spahn went to the west coast, pitching his final major league games in a Giants uniform.
 
 
 
Spahn did not leave gracefully, grumbling, "I didn't quit; baseball retired me," and he pitched briefly in Mexico and in the minors until 1967 before finally retiring from the game.
 
Spahn did not leave gracefully, grumbling, "I didn't quit; baseball retired me," and he pitched briefly in Mexico and in the minors until 1967 before finally retiring from the game.
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==After Baseball==
 
==After Baseball==
 
   
 
Spahn briefly managed the [[Tulsa Oilers]] AAA franchise in the Pacific Coast League in the 1960's. He also coached for the Mexico City Tigers, and also pitched a handful of games there. He was a pitching coach with the [[Cleveland Indians]], in the minor leagues for the [[California Angels]], and for six years, with Japan's Hiroshima Toyo Carp.
 
Spahn briefly managed the [[Tulsa Oilers]] AAA franchise in the Pacific Coast League in the 1960's. He also coached for the Mexico City Tigers, and also pitched a handful of games there. He was a pitching coach with the [[Cleveland Indians]], in the minor leagues for the [[California Angels]], and for six years, with Japan's Hiroshima Toyo Carp.
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==Death==
 
==Death==
[[Image:spahn_statue.jpg|left|thumb|100px|Spahn Immortalizaed in Atlanta]]
 
 
 
Spahn died at age 82, apparently of natural causes, at his home in [[Broken Arrow, Oklahoma]]. He is interred in the Elmwood Cemetery in [[Hartshorne, Oklahoma|Hartshorne]].
 
Spahn died at age 82, apparently of natural causes, at his home in [[Broken Arrow, Oklahoma]]. He is interred in the Elmwood Cemetery in [[Hartshorne, Oklahoma|Hartshorne]].
   
In [[1999]], he ranked Number 21 on ''[[The Sporting News]]''' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was elected to the [[Major League Baseball All-Century Team]]. Another honoree, [[Sandy Koufax]], joked, "He ''should'' be on the All-Century Team, since he pitched most of the century." The fans missed him, but he was added by a special Committee to the all-century team.
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He was elected to the [[Baseball Hall of Fame]] in [[1973]], his first year of eligibility.
   
Bill James ranked Spahn number 36 of the 100 greatest baseball players of all-times based on his Win-Shares method of valuing players and their accomplishments.
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In [[1999]], he ranked Number 21 on ''[[The Sporting News]]''' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was elected to the [[Major League Baseball All-Century Team]]. Another honoree, [[Sandy Koufax]], joked, "He ''should'' be on the All-Century Team, since he pitched most of the century."
   
A statue of Warren Spahn resides in Atlanta, showing him in the midst of his memorable high leg kick.
 
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==Quotations==
 
==Quotations==
 
"Hitting is timing. Pitching is upsetting timing."
 
"Hitting is timing. Pitching is upsetting timing."
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==See also==
 
==See also==
*[[/Magazine covers|Magazine covers]]
 
 
*[[300 win club]]
 
*[[300 win club]]
 
*[[MLB All-Time leaders in Homeruns for a Pitcher|All-Time leaders in home runs for a Pitcher]]
 
*[[MLB All-Time leaders in Homeruns for a Pitcher|All-Time leaders in home runs for a Pitcher]]
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[[Category:1921 births]]
 
[[Category:1921 births]]
 
[[Category:2003 deaths]]
 
[[Category:2003 deaths]]
[[Category:Hall of Fame]]
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[[Category:Baseball Hall of Fame]]
 
[[Category:Major league pitchers]]
 
[[Category:Major league pitchers]]
 
[[Category:Boston Braves players]]
 
[[Category:Boston Braves players]]
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